Atlantic/U.S.East Coast

GMRI Position Posting: Electronic Monitoring Project Manager

List Date: Friday, March 23, 2018

Close Date: Friday, April 6, 2018

JOB TITLE: Electronic Monitoring Project Manager

SUPERVISOR: Technical Programs Manager — Fisheries Technical Assistance Program

TERM: 18 month position, with possibility of renewal subject to funding

OVERVIEW

The Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) pioneers collaborative solutions to global ocean challenges. Our scientists explore dynamic ocean systems from marine life to environmental conditions to coastal economies. We infuse our discoveries into the policy arena and design solutions with fishermen and seafood business to protect fishery resources, harvest them responsibly, and market them as premium quality food. We share our discoveries with the public and nurture a culture of leadership in communities that depend on the sea. Our education… Read More »


Notice to EM Service Providers Regarding Opportunities in the Northeast

EM and Observer Vendor Show January 30th in Portsmouth, NH

The Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office (GARFO) and the Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) are evaluating the utility of Electronic Monitoring (EM) for catch monitoring on mid-water trawl vessels in the Atlantic herring and mackerel mid-water trawl fisheries.  The New England and Mid-Atlantic Councils have been interested in increasing monitoring in the herring and mackerel fisheries.  The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is working with the Councils to develop Industry-Funded Monitoring (IFM) through an Amendment in all New England and Mid-Atlantic fisheries (see Status_IFM_Amendment below).  A particular interest in this Amendment is increasing monitoring for the Atlantic herring and mackerel mid-water trawl fisheries due to concerns about bycatch of groundfish… Read More »


NOAA Issues Report from the National Electronic Monitoring Workshop

A diverse group of nearly 100 stakeholders gathered in Seattle in November 2016 to share information on what is working – and what challenges remain – in the implementation and integration of electronic monitoring technologies in fisheries observation.

This Second National EM Workshop was organized and planned by a steering committee of fishermen, managers, scientists, and fishery non-governmental organizations. It served as a follow-up to the First National EM Workshop, held in January 2014, which focused on encouraging the ongoing development of EM technologies.

The workshop featured ten panel discussions, organized both by region (Alaska, Atlantic HMS, Northeast, and West Coast) and topic (Considering Costs; Data Quality, Storage, and Retention; Emerging EM Programs; Program Design and Implementation; EM… Read More »


Gulf of Maine Explained: Electronic Monitoring

From the Gulf of Maine Research Institute

It’s easy to imagine fishing as a Wild West landscape, with fishermen heading out to sea, catching as many fish as they can, and selling them all back at the dock in a straightforward process.

In reality, fishing in the Gulf of Maine is a complex, heavily-regulated industry. Federal fisheries managers set strict limits for how much fish can be harvested in a given year. Fishermen in New England are then required to report their catch data to ensure they don’t exceed these limits. The catch is also monitored by human observers — people who ride along with the fishermen to verify their catch data.

Monitoring is important, but human… Read More »


At sea, under the eyes of cameras, fishermen work as the government monitors catch

NARRAGANSETT, R.I. — Chris Brown has grown used to the five video cameras that record every move he and his two crew members make aboard the Proud Mary.

Read complete article at Providence Journal


Electronic Monitoring in the New England Groundfish Fishery: Lessons learned from a collaborative research project (FY2013 – FY2015)

Click here for report in PDF

 

Executive Summary

In 2013, The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association (MCFA), the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) and Ecotrust Canada (‘project partners’) embarked on a three-year pilot project to further the development of electronic monitoring (EM) in the New England groundfish fishery. The overarching goal of the project was to determine if EM technology could be used to collect information on catch and discards that is comparable to existing monitoring and reporting programs in a cost-effective manner. The primary objective was to develop an EM system that could capture high quality video footage for identification of groundfish species and accurate length estimates of individual fish discarded at sea… Read More »